Gallery

Gallery (click on images for higher resolution)

 

False-colored SEM image of an oxide field-effect transistor with a gate-length of ~ 70 nm (sample by Carsten Woltmann, PhD thesis). Zoom Image
False-colored SEM image of an oxide field-effect transistor with a gate-length of ~ 70 nm (sample by Carsten Woltmann, PhD thesis).

Photograph of an oxide chip containing several hundred thousand LaAlO3 - SrTiO3 field effect transistors. The colors are caused by light interfering with the transistor arrays (Carsten Woltmann). Zoom Image
Photograph of an oxide chip containing several hundred thousand LaAlO3 - SrTiO3 field effect transistors. The colors are caused by light interfering with the transistor arrays (Carsten Woltmann).
View into our pulsed-laser deposition system (target manipulator). Zoom Image
View into our pulsed-laser deposition system (target manipulator).
Top-view of a diamond used in a diamond anvil-cell with back irradiation (Jone Zabaleta). Zoom Image
Top-view of a diamond used in a diamond anvil-cell with back irradiation (Jone Zabaleta).
View of a thin-film sample mounted on a diamond in a diamond-anvil cell (Jone Zabaleta). Zoom Image
View of a thin-film sample mounted on a diamond in a diamond-anvil cell (Jone Zabaleta).

Optical microscope image of oxide field-effect transistors (LaAlO3-SrTiO3) made by Lukas Kürten. Zoom Image
Optical microscope image of oxide field-effect transistors (LaAlO3-SrTiO3) made by Lukas Kürten.
Photograph of a hot tungsten filament designed for a thermoelectronic generator (Alex Kyriazis). Zoom Image
Photograph of a hot tungsten filament designed for a thermoelectronic generator (Alex Kyriazis).
Photograph of a thermoelectronic energy converter in action. Zoom Image
Photograph of a thermoelectronic energy converter in action.
Thermolelectronic generator built to analyze in-situ and under operating conditions the work functions of quantum material heterostructures grown in our pulsed laser deposition system.<br /><br /> Zoom Image
Thermolelectronic generator built to analyze in-situ and under operating conditions the work functions of quantum material heterostructures grown in our pulsed laser deposition system.

<div style="text-align: justify;">Photograph of the laser ablation process in the PLD chamber.</div>
<div style="text-align: justify;">The invisible, ultraviolet beam of an excimer laser hits a SrTiO<sub>3</sub> target so that it shines as a blue disk (middle, top), creating a plasma plume (blue) which extends towards the substrate, a crystal of SrTiO<sub>3</sub> (white rectangle in the middle, bottom).</div>
<div style="text-align: justify;">A second invisible infrared laser beam heats the substrate to 1200°C, so that it glows white.</div> Zoom Image
Photograph of the laser ablation process in the PLD chamber.
The invisible, ultraviolet beam of an excimer laser hits a SrTiO3 target so that it shines as a blue disk (middle, top), creating a plasma plume (blue) which extends towards the substrate, a crystal of SrTiO3 (white rectangle in the middle, bottom).
A second invisible infrared laser beam heats the substrate to 1200°C, so that it glows white.
AFM micrograph of a NdGaO<sub>3</sub> surface after heating to 1050 °C in 7.5 Pa of oxygen. Zoom Image
AFM micrograph of a NdGaO3 surface after heating to 1050 °C in 7.5 Pa of oxygen.
 
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