Contact

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Professor Bernhard Keimer
Director
Phone:49 711 689 1650Fax:49 711 689 1632

Brief CV Publications and citations

Sonja Balkema
Secretary
Phone:49 711 689 1631Fax:49 711 689 1632

Heisenbergstr. 1 D-70569 Stuttgart

Solid State Spectroscopy

Physics of strongly correlated electron systems

The department uses neutron and X-ray diffraction and spectroscopy as well as optical spectroscopy and Raman scattering to explore the structure and dynamics of materials with strong electron correlations. We also have a strong effort in the development of new spectroscopic methods. As the close collaboration between experimentalists and theorists is essential for the progress in this field, a small theory group operates within the department.

News

Having graduated "with distinction" from the University of Stuttgart with a thesis on photon scattering from nickelate heterostructures, Matthias Hepting just won the Springer Thesis Award for outstanding Ph.D. theses. He is the fourth Springer Thesis awardee from our group, following Pegor Aynajian, Aliaksei Charnukha and Alex Frano.He will take up a postdoctoral position at Stanford University in February.

Matthias Hepting wins Springer Thesis Award

Having graduated "with distinction" from the University of Stuttgart with a thesis on photon scattering from nickelate heterostructures, Matthias Hepting just won the Springer Thesis Award for outstanding Ph.D. theses. He is the fourth Springer Thesis awardee from our group, following Pegor Aynajian, Aliaksei Charnukha and Alex Frano.
He will take up a postdoctoral position at Stanford University in February.
The interplay between charge density waves and high-temperature superconductivity is currently under intense investigation .Resonant x-ray scattering experiments have now shown that interfaces with manganates greatly enhance charge density wave formation in cuprate superconductors, over a remarkably large length scale of tens of nanometers. Long-range proximity effects induced by heterointerfaces thus offer a powerful method manipulate the interplay between different collective phenomena in metal oxides.

Long-range proximity effect of charge density waves in cuprates

The interplay between charge density waves and high-temperature superconductivity is currently under intense investigation .Resonant x-ray scattering experiments have now shown that interfaces with manganates greatly enhance charge density wave formation in cuprate superconductors, over a remarkably large length scale of tens of nanometers. Long-range proximity effects induced by heterointerfaces thus offer a powerful method manipulate the interplay between different collective phenomena in metal oxides.
 
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